Monthly Archives: August 2016

Have You Met…Microsoft Sway? (Part One)

If you haven't yet met Microsoft Sway, Sway is:
  1. an application for building interactive presentations that are optimized for web and mobile clients
  2. a (relatively) new component of Office 365
  3. the progeny of a product from Microsoft Office Labs, called pptPlex (in the "back in the day" department)
  4. Microsoft's answer to Prezi, a popular...
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Have You Met…Microsoft Stream?

Microsoft Stream, a new enterprise video-sharing service, was released to public preview last month, and we’ve been working with it since.  Here’s a two-minute introduction to get you started, including:

  • what Stream is and doesMicrosoft Stream
  • the product roadmap for Stream
  • how Stream fits into Office 365, alongside the existing Office 365 Video Portal
  • some excellent resources to give product feedback and learn more

As always, get in touch if you’d like to learn more, see a demo, or work on your plans for incorporating video into your productivity solutions!

…For the Enterprise

The "Consumerization of IT" has created new demand for user experiences, and Microsoft has excelled at the "Enterprization" of consumer applications by adapting the capabilities and even some of the visual style of leading consumer applications to be enterprise-friendly (i.e., managed and controlled in ways that adhere to corporate standards for security, privacy, and reliability). In...
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Have You Met…LOREM and RAND?

People doing website or document layouts often need to use filler text to work on the page layout prior to having the content finalized.  This week’s two-minute “Have You Met” video introduces a couple of useful, but little-known, functions in Office to automatically create “Lipsum” or random filler text in Office documents.  Meet LOREM and RAND:

Have You Met…Modern SharePoint Lists?

Microsoft recently announced the (limited) release of the new lists in SharePoint Online, as part of Office 365.  For those of you who use lists extensively, I think you’ll find some significant changes and improvements here, and Microsoft has opened the door to the use of “PowerApps” (still in preview, video on this coming soon) and Microsoft Flow, for creation of SharePoint-aware mobile apps by “citizen developers,” ie, people like me who don’t have coding chops but who understand the application, can configure, drag drop, etc.

Have a look, and don’t hesitate to contact Collacrity if we can shed more light on the subject.